Polygon to Showcase PolyMed® Composite Medical Tubing for Highly Engineered Surgical Devices at Compamed 2019

Walkerton, Indiana, United States of America – Polygon Composites Technology, designer and manufacturer of PolyMed® Composite Tubing for medical and surgical applications, announces that it will exhibit at the Compamed Trade Fair, an international market and information platform for the medical suppliers and product developers. The fair is planned for November 18 to 21, 2019 in Düsseldorf, Germany. Polygon will exhibit with their distribution partner, IS-Sommer, in Hall 8a, Stand H03. Tailored for each customer’s application, PolyMed® Composite Tubing is ideal for medical devices which have endoscopic and laparoscopic applications. PolyMed is commonly placed on monopolar and bi-polar electro-surgical devices, surgical ablation tools, endoscopic/laparoscopic instruments, as well as on robotic surgery technologies. Polygon’s composite tubing combines lightweight materials and strong physical characteristics, as well as radiolucent and dielectric properties, thin walls, rigidity and the ability to be sterilized with Ted Wallace, Director of Sales and Marketing at Polygon says, “Composites are an excellent replacement for stainless steel tubing and other metals in medical applicati...

ACT and Queanbeyan firefighters (L-R) James Rumble, Jacob Lemmey, Simon Butt, Matt Buchtmann and Dani Curcio

ACT and Queanbeyan firefighters (L-R) James Rumble, Jacob Lemmey, Simon Butt, Matt Buchtmann and Dani Curcio in training mode for the Firies Climb for MND. Photo: Michael Weaver. We all know the feeling we get when we climb a flight of stairs in a hurry. It kind of takes your breath away. So, stop and take a breath as you think of what it would take to climb to the top of the Sydney Tower – a staggering 1504 stairs or 98 floors. A group of dedicated firefighters from the ACT and Queanbeyan will do exactly that on November 9 when they climb to the top of the Sydney Tower to raise money and awareness for motor neurone disease (MND). The group, called the ACT Capital Climbers, will also make the climb with their structural firefighting gear that weighs up to 25kg. This includes a breathing cylinder and firefighting helmet. Leading the climbers is James Rumble from Queanbeyan Fire and Rescue, who says the extra weight is nothing compared to the weight carried by someone diagnosed with MND. The cause is close to James’ family when his mother-in-law was taken by the disease in 2014. He knows others in the wider family of firies also affected by MND. “It is with a great deal of pride ...