Environmentalists fear that coal mines loom on the horizon for lands removed from the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, but the first mineral to be extracted there may have more to do with soul-inspiring art than climate-altering emissions. Exposed deposits of the delicate form of calcium sulfate happened to be found among the 900,000 acres President Donald Trump removed from the monument. An area known as Butler Valley, south of Henrieville, was actively quarried when President Bill Clinton designated the monument in 1996. Now David Penney, a sculptor from Beaver, hopes to extract pink-streaked alabaster from one of these abandoned quarries at his Creamsicle mine. “It creates an art form that people can enjoy for years,” Penney said. “If you don’t take it out of the ground, it just dissolves away. It’s a way to preserve some of the beautiful things nature has created.” Alabaster quarries, along with coal mining and oil and gas drilling, soon can occur on most of these former monument lands under a management plan released this month by the Bureau of Land Management. Environmental and science groups suing to reverse Trump’s action have been preoccupied with vast coal...